Hello, reader! If you intend to post a link to this blog on Twitter, be aware that for utterly mysterious reasons, Twitter thinks this blog is spam, and will prevent you from linking to it. Here's a workaround: change the .com in the address to .ca. I call it the "Maple Leaf Loophole." And thanks for sharing!

Friday, June 19, 2015

Friday Favorites 2

Hey there! Two Fridays in a row! Whaddup! Here are some things that got my attention in a good way this week:

Geoff Krall's Minimal Conditions

Geoff Krall (of PBL Curriculum Map fame) gives an excellent wide-angle view of practices school staff should engage in when they get serious about improving instruction. My favorite thing about this is it seems so do-able. There are things small groups of teachers can start doing with the PD time that's in their control, or if that time isn't yet in their control, suggests some concrete practices to start advocating for.

Allison Krasnow's Virtual Patty Paper

Allison rediscovered a great patty paper book by Michael Serra, and noticed that all of the activities could be recreated on Geogebra. I love this! It demonstrates that ways for students to tinker with ideas -- the important part -- is somewhat independent of choice of technology. Use the patty paper, create a Geogebra version, use both, or give students a choice.

What Collaborating Looks Like

Many of us know that we should be collaborating with building colleagues on the nuts and bolts of planning and instruction, but if you've never done this before, it can be hard to imagine what it looks like. This video series (a collaboration between Teaching Channel, Illustrative Mathematics, and Smarter Balanced) is a really excellent resource including teachers working in elementary, middle, and high school math before, during, and after instruction.

Jackie Ballarini's School's Starting Page

Hey, if you haven't put all the stuff your new teachers need to know in one place, like this, you should! This page was shared during a conversation initiated by Rachel about supporting new teachers, and everybody drooled over it.

Jonathan Claydon is Not Leaving

I really enjoyed reading Jonathan's piece about why he intends to remain a classroom teacher. In this environment it's contrary to so many other articles coming out about folks throwing in the towel, and I think Jonathan shares important sentiments that usually go unarticulated, or at least don't go viral. But should.