Alert!

Hello, reader! If you intend to post a link to this blog on Twitter, be aware that for utterly mysterious reasons, Twitter thinks this blog is spam, and will prevent you from linking to it. Here's a workaround: change the .com in the address to .ca. I call it the "Maple Leaf Loophole." And thanks for sharing!

Friday, June 12, 2015

Favorites Fridays 1

Hi! Welcome to Favorites Fridays. Instead of just sharing or retweeting on Twitter, which is ephemeral and misses lots of people, I'm going to start collecting my favorite stuff from the mathematical educational Internet from the week here. I've never been one for regular publishing or weekly series-es, but we're going to give this a try. (This may be a dumb time to start this because I'm heading off on vacation next week and I promised my boi-freeeen I'd give Twitter a rest, so I'll skip a week soon but anyway.) I hope you find it useful, but this is also for my personal archival use too. Here goes!

Dandersod's Calculus Projects

Dan Anderson (@dandersod) (does anyone else just think of him in their head as "dandersod?") set a project for his calculus kids, live-tweeted it, and published their reports. You might have mixed emotions about the phrase "calculus projects," but I found these to be super fun, interesting, entertaining reading.

Lani's Memo

This memo focuses on research-based ideas on how to support common planning time so that it has the greatest potential for teacher learning about ambitious mathematics teaching. To that end, we provide a framework for effective conversations about mathematics teaching and learning. We develop the framework by using vignettes that show examples of stronger and weaker teacher collaboration.
"Sometimes, you ask and the internet answers." Lani Horn came through with what Julie, and many teachers are looking for: nuts and bolts direction for teachers hungry for useful professional conversations. We're tired of wasting collaboration time and "PLC time" (a now-meaningless name if there ever was one) on aimless, unhelpful activities that don't have an impact on our practice, and we know there's a better way. This post is going to be a huge help. Bonus: a summary on research about using student performance data.

Tracy Zager's ShadowCon Talk


It will blow your doors off. Tracy is dazzling. Just go watch it. Best use of word clouds in history.

Mike's How to Build a PBL Culture

Mike's PBL is Project Based, but I think this fab collection of activities and recommendations for kicking off a school year would work just as nicely if your PBL is Problem Based.

And that's a wrap! Somebody hold me accountable for doing this next Friday!