Alert!

Hello, reader! If you intend to post a link to this blog on Twitter, be aware that for utterly mysterious reasons, Twitter thinks this blog is spam, and will prevent you from linking to it. Here's a workaround: change the .com in the address to .ca. I call it the "Maple Leaf Loophole." And thanks for sharing!

Sunday, September 9, 2012

Week 3 of the New Bloggers

Katie Cook @kjgolickcook is my Real! Life! Colleague! She is very funny and very awesome and finally has a blog (yaaayaayaaay! (Kermit arms)) named Math Teacher by Day. Her post for this event is Why Do We Have to Learn This? and includes three very solid responses to that question. I'm looking forward to good things from Katie's blog - she's a long ball hitter, that one.

Chris Rime @chrisrime has a blog named Partially Derivative. The third post for the Blogging Initiation is titled NBI #3 — In which a student learns the truth about math class and the author sums it up as follows: "All about how I respond to that infamous, "When are we ever going to use this?" question. With super-bonus material related to the apparent difference between illiteracy and innumeracy." A memorable quotation from the post is: "This is as real as the world gets."

Sarah Miller has a blog named Proof in the City. The third post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Math Quotes and the author sums it up as follows: "I wrote about one math quote that I like, and how it has affected my teaching." A memorable quotation from the post is: "I even found a quote to explain why I love quotes."

Carl Edgren and Hannah Schuchhardt @hschuchhardt, @carledgren have a blog named Teaching Systematically. The third post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Get to the point. and the author sums it up as follows: "Students often just want to know the answer to problems - mathematics is the process of completing a problem for the correct answer. We need to show them that learning mathematics is about analyzing the world around us!" A memorable quotation from the post is: "The students simply want us to get to the point already."

helen oehrlein has a blog named Bowditch's Apprentice. The third post for the Blogging Initiation is titled A Hodgepodge of Ideas? and the author sums it up as follows: "I have come to believe that Precalculus is not a hodgepodge of ideas, but a study of the deeply related Mandala of the Functions (as Berlinski sees it). Furthermore, although these functions have much in common, their differences shine a light on why we really do need so many different functions." A memorable quotation from the post is: "Inverse functions are so useful that we truncate the trigonometric functions in order to create them, and we actually have a totally artificial, man-made inverse of the exponential function, namely the logarithmic function."

Mark Davis @graphpapershirt has a blog named Graph Paper Shirt. The third post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Where's All the Stuff Come From? and the author sums it up as follows: "This post is about how students come to class with misconceptions about photosynthesis and where plant material comes from. It's such an important concept to understand because it encompasses the fundamental idea of how the sun ultimately powers (almost) all life on earth." A memorable quotation from the post is: "To make a long post short, the students learn that even some of the brightest students in our country don’t know something as fundamental as where plant material comes from, and ultimately their food, and themselves!"

Jasmine has a blog named Jazmath. The third post for the Blogging Initiation is titled I Was Never Good at Math Either and the author sums it up as follows: "Parents night is an important time to show families how class really runs and the attitudes that we hope to instill in students. I try to run the ten minutes that I get with each set of parents as if it's a real class period." A memorable quotation from the post is: "I want to keep the focus on how we deal with discomfort and what we want to model for our children."

Kelly Berg @kmbergie has a blog named The M Stands for Math. The third post for the Blogging Initiation is titled Sharper questions and the author sums it up as follows: "I took a risk to teach material with meaning instead of with boring-ness. My risk paid off to the student's benefit. Students were involved and engaged. BAM!" A memorable quotation from the post is: "And right there I went from concrete to abstract AND they had better understanding of the concept because there was meaning attached to it."