Alert!

Hello, reader! If you intend to post a link to this blog on Twitter, be aware that for utterly mysterious reasons, Twitter thinks this blog is spam, and will prevent you from linking to it. Here's a workaround: change the .com in the address to .ca. I call it the "Maple Leaf Loophole." And thanks for sharing!

Monday, December 12, 2011

In Which Ben Articulates My Reasoning Better Than I Could

...and then some.

Read.

#takethetest

#passiton

I'll add, since I didn't provide much in the way of explanation. The NY Algebra 2/Trig test is a horror show. It tests many things. Notation. Vocabulary. Procedures. Graphing calculator button sequences. It is not a test of mathematical understanding. I am pretty sure any reasonably mathematically-literate adult would sit down to take it, and within twenty minutes be all like, "What the HELL is all this CRAP? And WHY are we inflicting it on our young people? Get me the Governor! Oh wait, I am the Governor!"

I just want the guy to know what his organization says is important for college-bound kids to know. Thats all. I'm not even totally anti-test. I'm anti horrible, very-bad, no-good test.

3 comments:

  1. I get your (and Ben's point), but let's be honest: Bloomberg and Bill Gates (!) would *smoke* a high school math test.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I sincerely doubt it. But we'll never know until they #takethetest.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well, if Bill Gates tried to take into consideration, as I did, that auditorium seats are *not* exactly the same in width as they are in depth (one seat back to another), he might have been momentarily perplexed by the test's "correct" answer to question 3.

    Ah, you have to assume that each person sits in a perfect square! (Oy, veh. Who thinks that?!!)

    As has happened to me many times, I was tripped up on a standardized test question by what is called "overthinking" it. Badly written tests: the only setting in which bringing real-world knowledge to bear on a problem is a BAD thing.

    Still wondering about my local school board member Rick Roach, though, who said that he didn't actually "know" any of the answers during his now famous attempt at the Florida 10th grade math FCAT. The sample questions were actually not very hard -- not nearly as bad as the NY test!

    ReplyDelete

Hi! I will have to approve this before it shows up. Cuz yo those spammers are crafty like ice is cold.