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Wednesday, August 24, 2011

It's Amazing What a Good Night Sleep will Get You

Linear review lesson for Algebra 2 - version 2 - I like this much more better.
Here it is as a word document if you want to steal parts.

20 comments:

  1. I don't know if it's my system or box.net (or some other step along the way), but my download chops off after the first page.

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  2. I should have also said, I love it.

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  3. Yeah I don't know Sue, it should work fine as far as I can tell.

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  4. Sorry, Sue. It downloaded fine to my computer. Hope that means it will work for you on a different machine.

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  5. My eternal thanks to Sarah, who emailed it to me. It still had the problem at my end, so I figured it was my old version of Word being cranky. Sarah sent me a version of the file that worked with my version of Word!! I hope to make some minor modifications and use it tomorrow. Thanks, Kate!

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  6. Oh dear, Sue, I could have emailed it to you! Sorry I didn't know you never got the box.net problem resolved. Thanks, Sarah.

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  7. Dear Kate, it wasn't a problem. Sarah contacted me and offered to help. I've been so busy today, there wasn't even time to ask.

    Thank you so much for all you do, you tech goddess.

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  8. Oh please. As I told Sue, I'm merely the witch that is able to channel some of Kate's Goddess energies. I'm just happy that I figured out where Sue's e-mail address was.

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  9. Love this, thank you! I teach 8th grade but can see how useful this will be with my Alg 1 students. I've been reading your blog for a while now (~1.5 years) but never commented. I really enjoy reading your candid reflections on your practice as well as "borrowing" your awesome lessons and activities. You are an inspiring teacher, and I'm hoping to use some of your SBG stuff to encourage my department to try it this year. Thanks so much, and have a great year!

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  10. Really nice job with this. Hopefully your kids will react properly and not say "Who are these boys of which you speak?"

    Don't forget, every Friday's problem set needs a Rebecca Black reference.

    Mathematically, I especially like how little overhead there is: it's working on problems right from the start. #13 rocks. #16 rocks. #17 looks familiar somehow, but stealing is part of the job. More math problems need to include the phrase "Jake is a punk." Keep it up!

    Technicalities: y-3 = 1/2(x-12) isn't the equation of a line, it's AN equation of a line -- there's always more than one. (You otherwise nail this.) Also I would argue that slope is a property of two points, not just lines: this will help with those pesky "average rate of change" problems that come later.

    Suggestions for the future: don't try to do this every day... but try to do it once a week or once every two weeks. Then, next time around you have this huge bank of great problem sets to either add to or adapt from.

    Thanks for sharing it!

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  11. Ooh, I was hoping Bowen would see this and be complimentary. I'm swooning over here.

    Thank you for the pointers. I tried to be careful about all the little wording stuff like "the equation" vs "an equation" but I'm not surprised I missed some things.

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  12. The only way I learned that stuff about lines is by doing it wrong a dozen times and getting yelled at by the lead author ;)

    What's next, a problem set with Van Halen references?!

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  13. MAYBE. Akshully, enough of the children are Beasties-familiar that I'm confident going ahead with this set. They wouldn't so much be with Van Halen. I know: up is down, black is white, dogs and cats, anarchy.

    FYI, I already picked us a song for next year. I would disclose it but not in a blog comment because TOP SECRET. Fingers crossed that SSTP exists at a magnitude to which I gain entry.

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  14. Please, for the sake of the children, no problem sets about NKOTBSB or LMFAO...

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  15. Thanks for sharing this. I've had several conversations with teachers over the past week about how best to approach the first week back. There seems to be two camps. One side wants to hit them with review sheets. The other side wants rich problem solving activities. You've kind of married the two with this one. It appears worksheet-like, but the thinking and problem solving here is rich. I would use this.

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  16. I like the pictorial representation of a linear function. The numbers in the equation y = 2x + 6 when relating the number of gray squares to the case number give meaning to slope and y-intercept, much more so than if students were just examining table of values or points on a graph.

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  17. Thanks, Kate. I included a link to Mimi's blog in my post. http://wp.me/p1OFpp-3g

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  18. For students to make sense of linear relations, I think there needs to be a blend of problems such as these that are interesting in and of themselves AND real-world problems like Dan Meyer's stacking cups problem or the iCost lesson from Mathalicious.

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  19. OMG. I love this so much. I'm starting my first year of teaching in August, and I have to say that being able to find awesome things like this on the interwebs is helping me so darn much! Implementing SBG and creating lessons that don't totally suck with a textbook that isn't fit to be used as toilet paper is a pretty daunting task for a first-timer. All the stuff veteran bloggers like you have posted is really gonna help me (and my kids) sooooo much!

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Hi! I will have to approve this before it shows up. Cuz yo those spammers are crafty like ice is cold.